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Fashion waste grows in Australia

Taupe bamboo dress

Australians are the second largest consumers of new textiles worldwide and, at the same time, fashion is one of Australia’s fastest growing waste problems.

RMIT has announced an exhibition around the cost of fast fashion, with 11 workers killed in the latest controversy to hit the sector. Their exhibition Fast Fashion: the dark side of fashion, (21 July – 9 September), will take a critical look behind the scenes of the fashion industry and consumer habits.

It comes as Bangladesh authorities launch an investigation into a blast at a factory that killed at least 11 workers earlier this month. This is the latest disaster to hit the country’s lucrative but low-cost garment industry.

 

The exhibition addresses the social, economic and environmental impacts of cheap fashion, and explores new fashion practices and experiences to bring about positive change.

Australians are the second largest consumers of new textiles worldwide and, at the same time, fashion is one of Australia’s fastest growing waste problems. RMIT senior lecturer Dr Jenny Underwood said fashion reflects who we are as an individual and as a society.Read more at http://www.ragtrader.com.au/news/fast-fashion-revolt-after-11-fashion-deaths#sFL2Em48310eb5G7.99

This is why we at Simply Silk work hard to ensure we provide clothing as ethically, environmentally and socially responsible as we can. Silk clothing may cost more than polyester garments but it is a product from silkworm cocoons that will last for many years and does break down easily if ever it ends up in land fill. Silk clothing does not have to be washed as frequently as other fabrics as it naturally detracts odours and soiling. Bamboo fabric has similar properties to silk which is why we introduced our bamboo range almost 10 years ago, and has a lower more afordable price point. Our silk is manufactured in China, the first country to ever produce silk thousands of years ago. We ensure the factory pays its staff almost 3 times what the Bangladesh workers receive.

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